Jul 142017
 

The following post continues the description of my visit to Poland that I took during my time as a law student in Germany.  Originally written as multiple posts in October 2005 and is the portion that best explains why I was taking the trip.

I did it again: I picked a spot on the map, and then went to go see what it was like.

The place I went to see was Suwalki, a town in the very northeast of Poland. In fact, it’s so northeastern that it hasn’t always been part of Poland. Within the past two centuries it’s also been claimed by Russia and Lithuania.

It’s a bit off the beaten trail. My Lonely Planet Eastern Europe book didn’t even list it, and it takes at least 5 hours to get to by train. (However, that says more about the speed of the train than the distance… It goes pretty fast to Bialystok, which is about two-thirds the way there, then turns into a local train that goes much slower the rest of the way. Plus they have to change the engine at a certain point because the tracks are no longer electrified.) But I had a particular reason for being there. Continue reading »

Jul 102017
 

With so much news coming out of Hamburg this week I decided it was time to repost what I’d written about my visit to Neuengamme, a concentration camp not far from the city.  I had spent several months in Hamburg as a law student, and this was a field trip organized by the law school.  The following, a combination of two posts originally written in October 2005, joins other items I’ve reposted from the blog I kept back then that reflected on my time there, particularly with respect to what it was like being Jewish in Germany and learning about the history of Jews in Germany

Keeping the holidays around here is challenging. My days are particularly packed, with more classes than usual as two of them wrap up this week. Yesterday began with Conflict of Laws, followed by Comparative Torts. Then almost immediately thereafter many of us boarded a bus for a field trip to the Neuengamme Concentration Camp.

It was one of those gorgeous fall days the holiday often falls on, sunny and pleasant. But we spent it in an environment whose modern serenity belied its past. Although this camp wasn’t dedicated to the extermination of Jews, per se, many did perish there (along with many, many others). On an occasion of contemplation, it was quite the place to spend the afternoon. Continue reading »

Jan 082016
 

In my third year of law school I did a semester abroad in Germany. It was a poignant experience, particularly as someone Jewish, to go invest in a place that so recently had been so unimaginably evil to people like me. The school itself (Bucerius Law School) was not unmindful of this history. For instance, at one point it took us on a fieldtrip to Neuengamme, a concentration camp in a nearby Hamburg suburb. And at another point it put on a screening of Jud Süß, one of the Nazi propaganda movies from the 1930s.

What with recent discussion about Mein Kampf and Anne Frank’s Diary entering the public domain it seemed like a good occasion to revisit what I wrote back then about the movie. It seems particularly important given similar demonization I’m hearing in Germany and beyond about the Muslims in their midst.

Below is the original blog post I wrote in November 2005, and below that the comment the post received, which shows that this sort of extreme, xenophobic hate is not entirely in our past. But it’s only by freely talking about that past that we can keep it from plaguing our future.
Continue reading »