Apr 112017
 

Dear United:

I write this letter as someone who has been a rather loyal United customer to date and would generally wish to remain so. I want to make clear at the outset, however, that this loyalty does not allow me to exonerate you of the serious concerns raised by your appalling treatment of Dr. Dao both on your flight and in your subsequent correspondence with employees. Both – and in many ways the latter especially – give me great pause and make me wonder if I can continue to patronize this airline. Unhappily, due to consolidation and other market failures, I may not actually have much choice: the best airline for me is one that offers plenty of direct transcontinental routes out of SFO and a global alliance I can use my resulting frequent flier miles on. Unfortunately, your closest competitors can only meet some of these needs, and thus any threat to take my business elsewhere is generally an idle one.

However, one of the reasons that I became a United customer in the first place, and have remained one more or less happily up to now, is that I like your airline. Flying another carrier always feels like visiting a stranger, whereas I’m used to the operational rhythm of how United works and how it works for me. I like liking it, and I want others to like it too, even if for no other reason than that your success helps improve my own travel experience (more routes, more flights, more amenities, etc.).

But your behavior this week, as well as on some other some other recent occasions, has made it difficult to recommend you, and that is no good for either of us. When passengers have to fly you begrudgingly it is unpleasant for everyone. For us, it makes us impatient, inflexible, and defensive, and thus for your employees, the same. We are all much better off when everyone can be proud to choose United, and that’s what the rest of this open letter is intended to make sure we all can be. Continue reading »